“IT’S TIME FOR A CHANGE!” OUR #GFB, CHRISTIANA ON DIVERSITY IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY.

“IT’S TIME FOR A CHANGE!” OUR #GFB, CHRISTIANA ON DIVERSITY IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY.

SLTV: What’s your name or fashion identity?
CL: Christiana Lazarine

SLTV: How long have you been blogging?
CL: This is my first time.

SLTV: What do you do for a living?
CL: I am self employed as a fashion designer and tailor.

SLTV: Why is fashion important?
CL: I think all artistic outlets are important.

SLTV: What is your dream?
CL: To live in a constant creative state.

SLTV: What is your favorite quote?
CL: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” –Mahatma Gandhi

Note from the Fashion Editor
This month, we here at Style Lush TV are celebrating diversity! From short girls to lanky ones, from plus size to short petites. Fashion belongs to everyone! Now, I love professional models, don’t get me wrong. I think they are beautiful and inspiring, but I have always found it just as beautiful and interesting to see non-model people, wearing personal style, showcasing real emotions and speaking with introspective thoughts. It has always been so exciting to see the underrepresented work their individuality and make no apologies for it. It takes courage to stand up to today’s media images, and say, “I won’t let you influence my perspective of beauty, Im going to wear this with pride”. Today, our #GFB, Christiana, collabs with us bring you her fantastic thoughts on the subject and showcases some of our fashion community along with their opinions as well. It’s inspired! Let’s all keep fighting the good fight. For fashion. For diversity. For the world. -Burg

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Diversity in Fashion
By: Christiana Lazarine

It’s time for a change. Fashion advertising paints a closed-minded picture of the world and is missing out on the chance to highlight diversity. What message is being sent when many demographics are excluded from the runway? While the fashion industry is making headway to highlight diversity, I often wonder when the runways will feature a broader representation of race, age, size and gender identity, etc.?

In terms of business why exclude potential customers by neglecting to represent them in advertising? And socially, why ignore any group or individual? Fashion branding in particular appears to be afraid that consumers won’t respond to change, that to maintain success they must abide by an often limited standard of beauty. Not only do I believe the world is ready for diversity in advertising, but that the current strategy is toxic and socially irresponsible. Though the industry alone is not completely to blame for the issue of inequality, it does subliminally perpetuate it.

In a time of inescapable advertising it is more important than ever for the media to be held accountable for its decisions and the subsequent effects. For years the fashion industry has stunted the progress of diversity with its narrow and often exclusionary perspective. This pattern of inaction suggests that the opportunity for change lies with the public. Fashion is after all, in constant motion and as consumers we need to remember the part we play in the process. Proof that our choices matter lie in the power of trends and how they are often derived from what the world is already wearing. If the industry is already acting upon our decisions, let us take the first step towards progress. By way of personal style, let us exercise our influence and celebrate who we are and who we wish to see on the runway. Before the media’s mindset of beauty can be broadened, we must first address our own feelings towards it and that, I believe, begins with humbly loving ourselves.

In preparation for this post, I spoke with some of San Antonio’s fashion talent and found their take on diversity refreshing. Their personal style is impacting the San Antonio fashion perspective and in turn, I believe their work is enacting change.

“I live for made to order custom pieces. I’m very short and very curvy so usually handmade is the only way to go.”

Kat Bustos copy

Kat Bustos wearing my white leather motorcycle vest with repurposed faux fur collar.
Kat Bustos
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“When I’m styling a shoot I really like to work with models of color because I feel there is limited representation of them in the fashion world. In my next projects I want to focus on styling plus size and gender-queer models.”

Wayne Holtz

Wayne Holtz wearing my wool capelet lined with faux fur pompoms.
Wayne Holtz
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“I hope to show diversity in my own fashion as well as inspire others to release any confinement and express their spirit through what they wear!”

“I use my bold style to show the lack of fear in my personality. Not only will I tell you what I’m thinking, my clothes will as well.”

 Roxy Eguia

Roxy Eguia wearing my lace bloomers with chiffon bell sleeves.
Instagram
Etsy

“…working with dancers to interpret collections on the runway diversifies our models.”

“Unique qualities embrace me in my style by allowing the world to compose my wardrobe with whatever I find at garage sales and thrift stores and sometimes ditches on my way to class.”

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From a distance the idea that personal style can bring about change is abstract. However, by simply emphasizing our uniqueness we take the initiative to bend the limits on an individual scale, a scale that has proven to be stronger than ever with social-media. Let us embrace our natural beauty and actively recognize it in those around us. Advocate for change by positively highlighting our differences, thus proving the necessity to promote diversity.

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Burgundy Woods
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Burgundy Woods has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music/Music Industries from the University of the Incarnate Word and a Design & Trend Forecasting degree from The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM) in Los Angeles. She began her career in Hollywood, California, where she worked for major record labels such as Virgin Records, Interscope Records, EMI Music and Capitol Records. Later after attaining her fashion degree, she was discovered by MySpace, Inc. and was immediately hired to be their Fashion Curator starring and producing her show THE B-SPOT Fashion & Trends on their Fashion & Shopping channel. During this time, online media was in its infancy. She and her colleagues contributed to the invention and molding of the online fashion media industry. Many of the stylized ideas and tools that were launched through these platforms are still used to this day as industry standards for online fashion media. Later, with her extensive experience in developing online fashion media, she continued the show independently and has successfully rebranded THE B-SPOT into Style Lush TV online fashion network. Now, with over nine professional years in online fashion media and trend forecasting, she continues to pioneer, maneuver and develop her industry. She is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Style Lush TV. She is also the President of the Texas Fashion Industry Initiative. The state's official non-profit for the positive growth of the Texas fashion industry.